Forest Bathing: No Soap Needed

Most of us cleanse our bodies on a daily basis, but have you ever given much thought to cleansing your mind and spirit as well? I’m not referring to traditional religious practice, although that may serve a similar purpose for some people. I’m talking about shinrinyoku — forest bathing.

Walking in the Michigan winter woods

A winter walk in the woods

In 1982 this term was coined by the Japanese government to describe the practice of walking in the woods for refreshment and escape from the hustle and bustle of urban environments. They recognized the health benefits of being immersed in nature and encouraged people to spend quiet time among the trees as often as possible to reduce stress levels. Scientists in Japan are conducting a range of ongoing studies measuring the physiological effects of various elements of the natural world, trying to quantify exactly how our bodies respond to nature. But even without knowing their results, I think we all know how good we feel when we get away from our desks and the concrete jungle, even if only for a short walk on our lunch hour.

Scientists here in the U.S. are also trying to establish objectively measurable evidence of the health benefits of nature. For example, a study at the University of Illinois came to some interesting conclusions:

Access to nature and green environments yields better cognitive functioning, more self-discipline and impulse control, and greater mental health overall.

Less access to nature is linked to exacerbated attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, higher rates of anxiety disorders, and higher rates of clinical depression.

The article goes on to explain that green spaces have more than just psychological benefits; they also have proven physical effects like helping you to recover quicker after surgery, improving your immune function, and even improving “functional living skills” among older people. In fact, I just read an article in the new issue of Birds & Blooms magazine that touts the benefits of “healing gardens” for dementia patients. Apparently these gardens are becoming more common at hospitals, senior centers, and even schools. I’m very encouraged by this, and I’ll have more to say about healing gardens in an upcoming post.

The scientists might need more evidence to satisfy them, but this is more than enough to convince me that I’ve named my blog appropriately: Nature [really] is my Therapy.

Gardiner River in Yellowstone National Park

Gardiner River in Yellowstone National Park

By the way, if you live in a location with lots of snow and bare trees right now (like I do), don’t despair; you can still get the benefits of “green”space without waiting for things outside to come back to life in a few months. All you need to do is decorate your home and office with pictures of flowers, gardens, rivers, or landscapes; then when you need a break, just gaze upon those peaceful images and feel your blood pressure go down, your breathing slow, your mood lift. If you’re skeptical that this works, try it. You’ll see.

Below are some photos of beautiful things I found because I was out looking for birds — I hope they make you happy too.

Looking up at birds is great, but looking at the ground can be rewarding too.

Looking up at birds is great, but looking at the ground can be rewarding too.

A carpet of woodland daffodils

A carpet of woodland daffodils

Beautiful ice formations on the melting Clinton River

Beautiful ice formations on the melting Clinton River

Just look at the intricate beauty of those wings! Imagine what it's like in his world....

Just look at the intricate beauty of those wings! Imagine what it’s like in his world….

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Sources for those of you who want to read more:

Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine: Trends in research related to “Shinrin-yoku” (taking in the forest atmosphere or forest bathing) in Japan (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2793347/?tool=pubmed)

Science Daily: Green Environments Essential for Human Health, Research Shows (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110419151438.htm)

This entry was posted in Ecotherapy, Flowers and Gardening, Health, Walking in the Woods and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Forest Bathing: No Soap Needed

  1. I love that ice picture! I have never seen ice formations quite like those. Your other pictures are great too!

  2. Littlesundog says:

    I believe that first photo is a fungus called, Turkey Tail. It grows in our woodlands on dead timber. I love walking in the woods… you know that! It’s truly where I feel at home. I must have been a woodland critter in a previous life!

    • Kim says:

      I never heard it called Turkey Tail before — someone told me a couple years ago that it’s called Rainbow Fungus. Just looked it up and apparently they’re both names for the same fungus — thanks for teaching me that cooler name!

      And yes, I believe you were a woodland critter in a past life, definitely. You do more “forest bathing” than anyone I know. 😉

  3. Great reminder for me to get out and see nature this week–I’ve got the February Blahs. I don’t ever think of taking a walk when it is cold out, here in the suburbs… but after reading this and seeing your great pictures I am looking forward to walking around a nearby pond and I think I’ll take my camera with me! Thanks Kim! 😀

    • Kim says:

      I know you’ll love it, Roxanne. It was only a couple years ago that I took my first walk in the winter, and it was eye-opening. There’s lots going on out there in the natural world while we’re all bundled up indoors.

  4. mindofshoo says:

    Nice pic of Yellowstone. I don’t need science to convince me that Nature is therapeutic. My time in Yellowstone convinced me of that. Those are easily the best times of my life. I was TRUELY happy.

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